Customer At Vegas’ Heart Attack Grill Suffers Heart Attack

In one of the more unfortunate cases of a company living up to its name, a man dining at the Heart Attack Grill in Las Vegas had exactly what was on the menu: A heart attack.

The diner was eating a “Triple Bypass Burger” — including 1.5 pounds of beef and a dozen bacon slices — this weekend when he began complaining of chest pains, according to a report from FOX5. Paramedics quickly arrived to treat the customer, who is now recovering.

The restaurant opened in the fall and quickly made headlines for its fatty foods, with meals that regularly feature nearly 10,000 calories. Servers are dressed – scantily – as “nurses” who take “prescriptions” from their “patients.”

“Patients” who weigh more than 350 pounds eat for free. “Taste worth dying for!,” the restaurant’s website crows.

The owner, “Doctor” Jon Basso — who doesn’t actually have medical background — said the incident was “horrible.” Continue Reading…

Questions And Answers On The Mortgage Settlement

After nearly a year of negotiations, federal and state officials and five major mortgage servicers have announced a $25 billion settlement over alleged past foreclosure and mortgage loan-servicing abuses. Here are answers to questions about the deal.

Q: Who is participating in the settlement?

STORY: Mortgage deal is broadest action taken in foreclosure crisis

A: All states except Oklahoma. Oklahoma reached its own settlement. The five servicers are Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citibank, Wells Fargo and Ally Financial. Smaller ones are expected to join later.

Q: Who may get help under the settlement?

A: Borrowers whose loans are owned by the participating banks and those who suffered foreclosures by one of them from 2008 through 2011.

Q: How will $25 billion be spent?

A: The terms include:

•At least $10 billion for reducing principal on loans for borrowers who are either delinquent or at imminent risk of default and are underwater — meaning they owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth. .

•At least $3 billion for refinancing loans for borrowers current on their mortgages and underwater.

•Up to $7 billion will go toward other kinds of assistance, including forbearance of principal for unemployed borrowers, anti-blight programs and short sales.

•$1.5 billion will provide cash payments to borrowers whose homes were sold or taken in foreclosure between Jan. 1, 2008, and Dec. 31, 2011, and who meet other conditions. Officials estimate up to 750,000 borrowers could receive checks for $1,500 to $2,000.

•$3.5 billion will be used to repay public funds lost as a result of servicers’ misconduct and to fund housing counselors, legal aid and other public programs determined by attorneys general.

•An additional $1 billion will be paid by Bank of America to resolve a separate federal investigation related to alleged wrongful conduct by the bank and Countrywide involving inflated appraisals of Federal Housing Administration-insured mortgages. Half of that $1 billion will be used to fund a loan modification program for Countrywide borrowers who are underwater on their mortgages. Bank of America acquired Countrywide in 2008. Continue Reading …

Jason Wu For Target Fashion For The Masses

Jason Wu For Target Fashion For The Masses: While football fans are gearing up for the Super Bowl, fashion fans may be heading to Target today, where designer Jason Wu is unveiling an affordable Parisian-inspired line that features delicate blouses, pleated skirts, handbags and clutches.

While luxury department stores can sell Jason Wu items for almost $5000, Target is selling almost 60 items, including women’s clothing and accessories, for under $60.

The collection became available Sunday morning, and already many of the items are sold out online. Continue Reading…

Liking Facebook’s IPO Could Be Problematic For Retail Investors

Liking Facebook’s IPO Could Be Problematic For Retail Investors: The buzz over Facebook’s forthcoming IPO has been propelled at least in part by retail investors hoping for a piece of the social media giant’s predicted $75 billion to $100 billion valuation.

But when the company’s stock eventually hits trading floors, Facebook fans who want to get in on the company’s initial public offering are likely to feel as left out as the Winklevoss twins.

Google’s 2004 IPO was conducted via a complicated auction process intended to level the playing field between big trading firms and the little guys. Absent such an arrangement, the advantage tends to go to the players with the most trading volume and money.

By the time your average online brokerage customer can get his or her hands on a stock like Facebook, it’s probably going to already be on an upward trajectory. And those investors hoping to buy on a dip should think twice.

Last year’s spate of tech IPOs saw the stock of companies such as LinkedIn and Zynga put on an initial bounce before stabilizing. However, the hype surrounding Facebook’s IPO has been building for so long that the stock price could stay elevated for longer than other recently debuted tech stocks, analysts say. Continue Reading…

12 IRS Audit Flags For 2012

English: United States Internal Revenue Servic...

12 IRS Audit Flags For 2012: “IRS audit” is one of most-feared phrases in the English language. While the chance of being audited is pretty low (about one in 100), the chance of being touched by the IRS is on the rise, according to my colleague Kathy Kristof. You may be one of the unlucky two percent of taxpayers who are subjected to random audits, but most IRS inquiries arise for specific reasons. Here are the 12 audit flags for 2012. Remember, many of these are legitimate — just make sure that you have all supporting documentation in case the IRS calls.

1. Not reporting income: Whoops — forgot about that consulting gig? The IRS receives copies of all 1099s and W-2s you receive, so make sure you report all income on your return. If you receive an incorrect 1099, talk to the issuer and make sure that a corrected form is filed with the IRS.

2. A large change in income: The IRS computers have all of your historic data, so when there’s a big change from the previous year, it can trigger a red flag.

3. Being self-employed: Self-employed workers take note: The IRS doesn’t trust you, because so many of you are trying to game the system by under-reporting income and overstating deductions. This class of taxpayer must be well-prepared to defend all deductions and credits. Continue Reading…

Mitch Daniels Can’t Save The Republican Party

White House Portrait of

Mitch Daniels Can’t Save The Republican Party: Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels (R) gave a perfectly serviceable speech last night. It was a bit dull, maybe, but it wasn’t a wrenching exercise in self-humiliation. Which is to say, by the standards of post-SOTU responses, it was a stunning, historic success. But it was also a reminder of the difficulties Daniels, a fantasy-draft presidential pick for many Republicans, would face if he entered the campaign.“When President Obama claims that the state of our union is anything but grave,” Daniels said, “he must know in his heart that this is not true.” And the reason for Daniels’ gloom was debt. We have too much of it. Much too much of it. And over and again, Daniels signaled that Republicans were not blameless in the rise of red ink. “The President did not cause the economic and fiscal crises that continue in America tonight,” he said. “To make such action happen, we also must work, in ways we Republicans have not always practiced, to bring Americans together,” he admitted. Continue Reading…